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NHB 1.720

United States

August 2016

The Korgel and Milliron Groups Present: “Chemical and Structural Transformations in Colloidal Nanocrystals” by Liberato Manna

08/10/2016 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
NHB 1.720 United States + Google Map

HOST: Dr. Brian Korgel and Dr. Delia Milliron ABSTRACT: Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are among the most exploited nanomaterials to date due to their extreme versatility. The present talk will highlight the recent progress from our group on the study of chemical transformations in nanostructures, via both cation and anion exchange. Cation exchange is mainly operative in binary ionic compounds and involves replacement of the sublattice of cations with a new sublattice of different cations, while the sublattice of anions remains…

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February 2018

ChE Seminar – ““Phase Mechanics” of arrested colloidal gels: A new paradigm for non-equilibrium phase transitions in soft matter” by Dr. Roseanna Zia (Stanford University)

02/13/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Roger Bonnecaze ABSTRACT Understanding kinetically arrested phase transition in complex media, and its influence on structure-property relationships, has been identified as one of the Grand Challenges for the future of soft matter science. Colloidal gels and glasses are an important class of such materials and are the subject of an emergent field of study in which much focus is placed on predicting yield behavior. More fundamentally, the physico-chemical nature of inter-particle colloidal attractions has permitted the construction of…

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September 2018

Lynd Group Presents: “Development of Living/Controlled Cationic Polymerization and Precise Synthesis of Various Stimuli-Responsive Polymers” by Dr. Sadahito Aoshima (Osaka University)

09/18/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Nathaniel Lynd ABSTRACT: We have developed new methods to prepare various well-defined stimuli-responsive polymers via living/controlled cationic polymerization, because the stimuli-responsive polymers have attracted significant interest in various fields. This presentation focuses on the following topics: (i) development of living cationic polymerization, (ii) highly stereospecific living cationic polymerization of N-vinylcarbazole, (iii) alternating cationic copolymerization and sequence-controlled polymers with precisely placed breakable bonds, (iv) precise synthesis of various stimuli-responsive block or star-shaped copolymers: block copolymers with UCST-type segment and LCST-type…

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October 2018

ChE Seminar – “Speed-dating for small RNAs with the Hfq chaperone” by Dr. Sarah Woodson (Johns Hopkins University)

10/02/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Drs. Lydia Contreras and Hal Alper; Cockrell School Endowed Lectureship ABSTRACT:  Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) regulate gene expression post-transcription in response to stress and other environmental signals. sRNAs contribute to bacterial pathogenesis and environmental adaptation. sRNA regulation requires the protein Hfq, which chaperones base pairing between sRNAs and their target mRNAs.  Hfq binds sRNAs and their mRNA targets, and accelerates base pairing between complementary sequences in the two RNAs. Time-resolved FRET experiments and light-triggered base pairing show that a patch…

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ChE Seminar – Dr. Ashish Singhal (Data Science Leader, Facebook)

10/09/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Michael Baldea; David Stevens Endowed Lectureship  ABSTRACT: “Data Scientist” has been recently termed as one of the most sought after roles in the recent years, not just in the tech sector, but across all industries. Almost every company seeks to best leverage the data they have collected over the years to create better products, services, and many times to simply take better business decisions. In this presentation, we will take a sneak peek at what means to be a…

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November 2018

ChE Seminar – “Computational Design of New Materials for Separations and Energy Storage” by Dr. Edward Maginn (University of Notre Dame)

11/20/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Venkat Ganesan ABSTRACT: Chemical separation technologies such as distillation account for tremendous amount of the world’s energy consumption. As a consequence, the National Research Council has called for the development of alternatives to distillation to meet the Energy Intensity of Chemical Processing Grand Challenge. In the first part of this talk, I will focus on ionic liquid solvents designed to preferentially separate CO2 from air, methane and hydrogen. Permeabilities / separation factors are computed for ionic liquids confined…

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ChE Texas Distinguished Faculty Lectureship Seminar – “High-Capacity Concentration Gradient Cathodes for Next-generation Lithium Batteries” by Dr. Yang-Kook Sun (Hanyang University)

11/27/2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. C. Buddie Mullins; Texas Distinguished Faculty Lectureship ABSTRACT: Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) have the highest gravimetric and volumetric energy densities among the commercialized batteries that can provide electric drives for plug-in hybrid (PHEVs) and fully electric vehicles (EVs). Despite the increasing utilization of the LIBs, the share of electric vehicles in the world’s automotive market has been growing at a slower rate than expected. The cost-to-range ratio can often be identified as one of the primary factors responsible for…

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January 2019

ChE Seminar – “The Importance of Interfaces: Using Ionic Liquids and Nanodiamonds to Explore New Concepts in Materials Design” by Dr. Matthew Gebbie

01/22/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

ABSTRACT:   Interfaces are critical to many pressing societal challenges, particularly in the areas of clean energy, water, and catalysis. This talk will present two examples of using systematic molecular engineering to investigate foundational theories in interface science. The first portion of the talk will discuss new insights into ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are composed entirely of ions and show promise as stable, nontoxic electrolytes, but higher conductivities are needed for most applications. Ionic liquids were initially hypothesized to have extremely…

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ChE Pirkey Centennial Lectureship Seminar – “Designing Biology for Health and Sustainability” by Dr. Pamela Silver (Harvard University)

01/29/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. B.K. Keitz; 2018-2019 Pirkey Lectureship ABSTRACT: The engineering of Biology presents infinite opportunities for therapeutic design, diagnosis, prevention of disease and solutions to environmental problems. We use what we know from Nature to engineer systems with predictable behaviors. We also seek to discover new natural strategies to then re-engineer. I will present concepts and experiments that address how we approach these problems in a systematic way. We have engineered components of the gut microbiome to act as both diagnostics…

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ChE Seminar – “Energy Efficient Separations using Metal–Organic Framework Membranes and Adsorbents” by Dr. Jonathan Bachman

01/31/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

ABSTRACT: Large-scale purification of chemicals and fuels has historically been achieved using energy-intensive thermally-driven distillation and scrubbing processes. With the recent development of metal–organic frameworks, a class of microporous adsorbents with unique pore structures and functionalities, we now have an opportunity to revisit and reinvent chemical separations. The M2(dobdc) (MOF-74; M = Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn; dobdc4- = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) family of frameworks is particularly promising due to coordinatively unsaturated metal sites that display selective gas-metal interactions. I will…

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February 2019

ChE Seminar – “Chemical Selectivity in Surface Deposition Reactions” by Dr. Gregory Parsons (North Carolina State University)

02/05/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. John Ekerdt ABSTRACT: Selectivity in chemical reactions, where one product is formed and a similar product is suppressed, is a long-standing challenge in reaction engineering. Catalytic reactions, for example, quantify selectivity in terms of the rate of formation of a desired product relative to that for an undesired product. In the field of nano-scale electronic devices, the need for localized material placement and lateral position control is now reaching the point where long-standing physical patterning tools (i.e. photolithography)…

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ChE Seminar – “Measurement and Modeling of Onroad Vehicle Air Pollutant Emissions and Exposure” by Dr. H. Christopher Frey (North Carolina State University)

02/12/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Drs. David Allen and Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz; Paul Hollingsworth Lectureship in Engineering ABSTRACT: There are over 1.3 billion onroad vehicles globally.  Vehicle operation contributes significantly to global energy use and emissions of greenhouse gas, criteria, and mobile source air toxic air pollutants.  Vehicle emissions lead to adverse effects on human health, including approximately 200,000 premature deaths globally.  The objective of this work is to quantify the real-world energy use and emissions from onroad transport, to quantify the sensitivity of emissions to…

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ChE Seminar – “Controlling Electrochemistry using Electrolyte Design” by Chibueze Amanchukwu

02/14/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

ABSTRACT: To accelerate the electrification of transport, batteries based on a lithium metal anode and an oxygen/sulfur-based cathode with high energy densities have elicited great interest. However, electrolyte selection and degradation has limited the maximal energy that can be extracted, and reduced cycle life. In this talk, I will discuss my work on developing small molecule and polymer-based composite electrolytes that can decouple instability from ionic transport. I show novel ionic transport processes within these electrolyte architectures, and their ability…

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ChE Seminar – “Elucidating Electrochemical Energy Materials through Versatile Electrochemistry” by Dr. Joaquín Rodríguez-López (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

02/19/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Delia Milliron ABSTRACT: My group creates electroanalytical techniques and strategies to control materials and interfacial reactivity for applications in energy storage and conversion. In this seminar, I will discuss how new polymeric and low-dimensional materials, as well as an expanded electroanalytical toolbox for understanding interfaces and nanomaterials, are allowing us to discover new synergies at the nano- and mesoscale for emerging battery technologies. I will describe one system where nano-scale heterogeneity has an impact on macro-scale performance: novel…

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ChE Seminar – “Decoupling Ion Transport and Modulus in Polymeric Ionic Liquids” by Gabriel Sanoja

02/21/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

ABSTRACT: Polymeric ionic liquids (i.e. PILs) are single ion-conducting materials that exhibit the thermal and electrochemical stability of ionic liquids and the mechanical properties of polymers. Although PILs are exciting for a variety of applications in energy conversion and storage, the tradeoff between mechanics and conduction remains an important limitation in materials design. Herein, we present dynamic polymer networks based on metal-ligand coordination as promising materials toward this aim. We will examine the effect of the nature and concentration of…

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ChE Seminar – “Engineering Hierarchical Polymers to Control Biomolecular Transport” by Danielle Mai

02/26/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

ABSTRACT: New materials that control specific biomolecular transport will be central to numerous technologies including biosensors, bioseparations, and tissue engineering. Natural systems such as nuclear pores routinely regulate molecular transport with remarkable specificity (>99.9% of proteins rejected) and speed (1,000 proteins per second per pore), but the biophysical mechanisms underlying selective nuclear transport remain unclear. The central channel of the nuclear pore is filled with a disordered matrix of nucleoporin proteins, which inspires the development of a selective transport model…

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March 2019

ChE Seminar – “Protein Engineering of Multi-functional Biomaterials for Regenerative Medicine” by Dr. Sarah Heilshorn (Stanford University)

03/05/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: Dr. Adrianne Rosales ABSTRACT: Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy for a myriad of debilitating diseases and injuries; however, current expansion and transplantation protocols are inadequate. My lab designs biomaterials to overcome these challenges using biomimetic, protein-engineering technology. By integrating protein science methodologies with simple polymer physics models, we manipulate the polypeptide chain interactions and demonstrate the direct ability to tune the material properties including hydrogel mechanics, cell-adhesion, and biodegradation. These materials have allowed us to identify matrix…

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April 2019

ChE Seminar – “Advancing Manufacturers Competitiveness Through Smart Manufacturing” by Dr. Jim Wetzel (Clean Energy Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute)

04/09/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Hosts: Dr. Michael Baldea and Dr. Thomas Edgar ABSTRACT: The word Smart Manufacturing is gaining the world’s attention. The Clean Energy Smart Manufacturing Innovation Institute has been launched with support from the Department of Energy, learn how this  institute is  advancing manufacturing in the US, its goals and plans.  I will also go into detail about examples from leading companies who have started their Smart Manufacturing journey and can show all of us a reason to believe in the tremendous value…

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May 2019

The ChE Graduate Leadership Council Presents: “Photoresponsive hydrogels for studying and directing organoid formation” by Dr. Kristi Anseth

05/07/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Host: The ChE Graduate Leadership Council ABSTRACT: During morphogenesis, flat cell layers buckle and branch to form three dimensional structures that develop into complex tissues.  Many of these processes are intimately coupled to the underlying extracellular matrix properties and the ability of the matrix to resist cell-generated traction forces.  To study such dynamic events requires biomaterial chemistries and properties that allow for adaptability, and photochemical reactions are particularly powerful for this type of experimentation.  This talk will focus on some…

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ChE Pirkey Seminar – “Recent Adventures with Porous Materials: Triggered Release and Anti-aging Membranes” by Dr. Matthew Hill (Monash University)

05/16/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States + Google Map

ABSTRACT: Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) show unprecedented capacity to store small molecules, however, the proposed methods to release these molecules are not yet feasible at a meaningful scale, largely due to the strong binding of stored molecules and the thermally insulating nature of the adsorbent. For example, carbon capture (and release and subsequent storage) from coal-fired power plants has been estimated to require between 25 and 40% of the energy output of the power plant though a more recent estimate…

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September 2019

Seminar: “Metabolic Engineering Strategies for Producing Oleochemicals in Bacteria” by Brian F Pfleger

09/03/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Finding a sustainable alternative for today’s petrochemical industry is a major challenge facing chemical engineers and society at large. To be sustainable, routes for converting carbon dioxide and light into organic compounds for use as both fuels and chemical building blocks must be identified, understood, and engineered. Advances in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and other bioengineering disciplines have expanded the scope of what can be produced in a living organism. As in other engineering disciplines, synthetic biologists want to apply…

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Seminar: “How can particles with a mass fraction of a few parts per billion have such huge health and climate effects?” by Neil Donahue

09/10/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Particles concentrate molecules and allow them to have outsized effects once they are large enough to scatter light, activate clouds, and deliver toxicants to the lung. The story of their size and composition is however nuanced and complex.

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Seminar: “Powering the Circular Economy for Fresh Produce: Engineering at Apeel Sciences” by Richard Pattison

09/17/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Today, 40% of the food grown goes to waste. Apeel Sciences seeks the advice of billions of years of evolution on Earth to solve this problem. They have developed processes to extract, repurpose, and apply the compounds which plants have evolved to construct barriers that slow the rate of water loss and oxidation. When applied to the surface of fresh fruits and vegetables, the result is a microscopic layer that results in a 2X or more extension in the edible…

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October 2019

Seminar: Bacterial two-component systems as sensors for synthetic biology applications

10/01/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

Dr. Jeff Tabor will discuss bacterial two-component systems as sensors for synthetic biology applications

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Seminar: “Using beams to study thin film growth in situ and in real time: from organic small molecule semiconductors to transition metal dichalcogenides” by James Engstrom, Cornell University

10/29/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

The study of thin film growth using real time techniques has always represented an important challenge to the experimentalist.  Over the past several years our group has been employing supersonic molecular beam techniques and in situ real time X-ray synchrotron radiation to examine a variety of systems in two important emerging areas:  organic small molecule semiconductors and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs).  In a number of cases we have supplemented the information we obtain from X-ray scattering, with results from in…

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November 2019

Seminar: Jennifer Holmgren, LanzaTech

11/19/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

The Department welcomes Jennifer Holmgren, CEO of LanzaTech. Becoming CarbonSmart: Being Mad without going Crazy! Jennifer Holmgren will talk about her journey in scaling up innovations that everyone thought were impossible. She will discuss the challenges of getting across the valley of death and what it means to build a successful team. She will touch upon her experiences at LanzaTech and how the development of the world’s first carbon recycling facilty in China has led to a whole new way…

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December 2019

Seminar: James Swan, MIT

12/03/2019 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

The Department welcomes James Swan, MIT. Dr. Swan's seminar is titled "Large Scale Simulation of Colloidal Hydrodynamics: Heterogenous Particles, Structures and Flow Patterns" Colloidal gels are formed during arrested phase separation. Sub-micron, mutually attractive particles aggregate to form a system-spanning network with high interfacial area, far from equilibrium. Such networks are useful as soft composites composed of a virtually limitless variety of materials in the particulate and fluid phases.  They find applications in food as soft solids like yogurt and…

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January 2020

Seminar: Siyuan Rao, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

January 30 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States + Google Map

The Department welcomes Siyuan Rao, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Rao’s seminar is titled “Engineering Platform for Brain-Machine Interface”. Diagnosis of many mental diseases relies heavily on behavioral assessment. To understand the principles of neural circuitry mechanisms and develop effective treatments, it is essential to ensure the accuracy of behavioral tests to assay phenotypes. Which kinds of tool platform can reveal causality between behavioral output and cellular activity? Engineering approaches can provide fundamental support to establish the ideal tool platform,…

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February 2020

Seminar: Donna Blackmond, The Scripps Research Institute

February 4 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

The Department welcomes Donna Blackmond, The Scripps Research Institute. Dr. Blackmond’s seminar is titled “Models for the Emergence of Biological Homochirality”. The single chirality of biological molecules has fascinated scientists and laymen alike since Pasteur’s first painstaking separation of the enantiomorphic crystals of a tartrate salt over 150 years ago. In the past several decades, a number of theoretical and experimental investigations have helped to delineate models for how one enantiomer might have come to dominate over the other from…

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Seminar: Marianthi Ierapetritou, University of Delaware

February 11 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States

The Department welcomes Marianthi Ierapetritou, Gore Centennial Chair, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware. Dr. Ierapetritou’s seminar is titled “Process Systems Engineering in the Era of Big-Data and Industry 4.0 Revolution”. Recent developments towards Industry 4.0 have led to focus in cyber-physical system, internet of things, and smart manufacturing that combined with the huge volume of data generated for the entire manufacturing cycle could lead to complete transformation of manufacturing of products. After the implementation of Industry…

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Seminar: Brian Belardi, UC Berkeley

February 13 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States + Google Map

The Department welcomes Brian Belardi, UC Berkeley. Dr. Belardi's seminar is titled, "Uncovering Epithelial Organizing Principles through Membrane Engineering". Epithelial cells accomplish a number of remarkable feats in the human body through chemically rich membrane structures. Epithelial membranes help protect the body from pathogens, they help form the complex shapes of organs, and they help excrete waste and take up nutrients necessary for homeostasis and survival. Many of these functions are so central to normal physiology that when disrupted lead…

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Seminar: Styliani Avraamidou, Texas A&M

February 18 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
NHB 1.720 United States + Google Map

The Department welcomes Styliani Avraamidou, Texas A&M. Dr. Avraamidou's seminar is titled, "Towards a Circular Economy Systems Engineering Framework". Natural resources play a critical role in the development and wealth of societies. They are vital for the provision of energy, food, shelter, transport, and all basic human needs and societal functions. Population growth, welfare growth, and the constant need for an increasing standard of living create major stresses on natural resources. Their extraction and depletion, and the waste generated throughout…

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